5 Things That Are Shockingly Cheap In Sweden

Publicerades den 12 apr 2021
Well I did a video about the most expensive things in Sweden so this one is only fair to make as well! Here it is, the 5 cheapest things in Sweden from an American's perspective.

Kommentarer

  • 2011 they changed the free university fee for countries outside eu.. I pay 99krona for phone and internet a month.. taken the bike everywhere is also cheap

  • Can you explain the school system? In Norway we have grunnskole from 6-15 -videregående Where you get fagbrev (as an elicrician, carpenter and so on) or studiekompetanse wich you ned to studenter futher in university (mastrrdegree) or universitycollege (bachleordegree)

  • Btw, can you understatement Norwegian in writing?

  • Candy by the kilo at maybe 1$/kg vs in the US it can easily be 2$/pound. This swedish candy culture could be a great movie for you to make.

  • I played football/soccer here in Sweden for 14 years for about 30 USD per year, so roughly 400-500 dollars for all those 14 years playing..

  • Ericsson is building your radio networks. They are Swedish, tested in Sweden caves of a unusually never usually ending up with a radio connection. Under ground bouncement off the buildings, it is really hard to get this thing right..

  • We moved to Sweden from Philadelphia about 1.5 years ago. I have 2 boys. Playing football/soccer was USD2500/year and swimming at the YMCA was $2000/year. Now they both play football in Sweden and it costs 2000/year... SEK! Yup... But I have found that the cost of living here is actually lower than in the US considering all the things we do not have to pay for. Oh! Car insurance... way more expensive in the US than here. And free dental care for the kids until they’re 23! And that includes orthodontics! My oldest had braces and that was nearly $4000 for one year. Yes, I’m grateful to have that in addition to healthcare. He was hospitalized in the US and here. I’m not even going to say how much that was. Here? Nothing! I love this place 💖 BTW, I’m not American and have lived in other countries as well. Sweden is my favorite, by far 💗

  • Wow! You actually mentioned Estonia. Greetings from here!

  • you talk in a microphone, but why does it sound like you're talking in the camera mike?

  • You obviously never lived in the US if you think your cellphone bill ranges between $30 to $50. It's much higher than that if you go with a main stream provider. Also, school is cheaper in the US than Sweden. $12000 a year for a BS in computer science vs $35000 a year in mid sweden university in Östersund. As you said, school is free in sweden to those who live in the EU. If you're from the US, prepare to ask your rich parents to pay your way.

  • You don't pay taxes to pay for your education, but to pay for the education of those after you. It's about growing as a whole, an entire society. It's not about paying for your own shit.

  • Cheap stuff, in Sweden? No, no, no you must be mistaken!

  • Sports, health care, infrastructure (such as public transportation and phone network), education is all funded more or less by the government and our taxes. It is sort of an investment on their side. Sports helps people be more healthy = less health care costs. Having good health means less sick people, means more gets done = more paid taxes. Good infrastructure also enables people to get to work more easily and good communications such as internet and cellphone service enables companies to earn more money which also means more taxes being paid. A well educated population attracts more companies from abroad but also creates profitable companies here = more taxes being paid.

  • I payed about 2000 kronor a year for dancing at quite a high level here in sweden, which would cost sooo much more in another country partly because the government funds many sports clubs especially thoose focused on youth programs to keep teens healthy and other stuff to.

  • Oh yeah, most team sports are super-cheap for kids and young people here. That's the kind of thing I wouldn't think to mention, appreciate that you highlighted that. And sorry to pile on the whole meat-thing, but it's true that we have much stricter laws regarding the treatment of animals than most places in the world. I am not going to speak on the quality of the meat, but I do know that what you are playing for is the cost of not treating animals like objects. To me that makes playing four times the prize worth it. It doesn't take being an expert, I'm certainly not, but just scratching the surface of the global meat industry is horrifying. I encourage you to google it even once, it's gonna make you feel better coughing up the swedish prizes in the grocery store.

  • I would say housing, since rents are controlled by legislation. In order to get these cheap apartment you may have to stand in a housing queue for a few years (more like 20 in Stockholm) but they "are" still cheap, at least in theory.....

  • There are no meat factories in Sweden.

  • du kan inte göra något annat än videos om sverige ...

  • Our baby was 6 weeks early. We were at the neonatal hospital for almost three weeks. Cost? $13 for the delivery. Coffee included.

    • Always a benefit to have a "gravid forsakring" in Sweden. I paid around 250kr for mine and I did it because I was pregnant with twins and I knew they were going to be premature. Insurance paid me 600kr a day for the neonatal stay and we were admitted for 5 weeks, so I got a HUGE lump of money once we got home. They also give you extra money for having a c-section and also extra money for the scar. I was also hospitalized before giving birth and I was paid 200kr a day for that.

  • Wine at Systembolaget - a pretty good deal.

  • Id love to know the difference of taxes between American and Sweden, i get the feeling that pays les tax then sweden therefore a lot of things appear to be cheaper in us

  • 100$ for the memberfee in my club =)

  • I found Hotels are cheap in Sweden compared to America

  • Re: #3 even if you don’t get the benefit of education for yourself and even if you don’t have children there is a benefit to living in a country where education is highly valued and most people have free access to it. And it’s just part of the culture to contribute to society. As a Canadian-Swedish person I personally don’t mind paying high taxes (and I pay them in both :) ) if I know my fellow countryhumans are well cared for. I think this is partly a cultural thing, totally my opinion and not based in fact but 🤷🏽‍♀️

  • Jag är så tacksam över Sveriges system! Det gör att vi alla har samma chans här i livet, att kunna utbilda sig till det man drömmer om. Fattigdom går inte i arv på samma sätt som det tyvärr kan göra i USA.

    • This! Alla har en chans att förändra sitt liv ✌ Oberoende av om du är förmögen eller inte.

  • Du skulle kunna göra ett inslag om vardagliga kostnader i Sverige vs USA och vad vi i Sverige får för våra *höga skatter*. Välj de vanligaste 20-25 kostnaderna så kommer begreppet höga skatter att krackelera. Sedan tillkommer att oavsett antalet kronor/dollar så kommer detta hur man värdesätter detta - jag vill tro att det är en myt att Sverige är dyrt att leva i. OM man ska jämföra med Norge (vårt broderland) så har Norrbaggarna hutlöst dyra hyror och att äta ute å resturant rena rama chocken när notan kommer, jo deras löner är rent generell högre men så kan Sverige vara billigare att leva i. En del svenska sjuksköterskor åker gärna till Norge för där får dom högre löner än i Sverige.

  • Sweden is actually on 6th place in the world of the highest health care cost per capita. We pay roughly about 55% of what Americans pay because we pay the vast majority of it in taxes instead of out-of-pocket. Which is not to say we don't pay out-of-pocket for a lot of our health care. Cancer treatment still costs you about a year's salary, same with a heart attack or anything that warrants an extended hospital stay and medication not covered by universal insurance. We also pay for our health care system regardless if we utilize it or not, which Americans don't.

  • Comparing Swedish meat industry vs US and saying you don’t know the different is just plain political correctness. US meats doesn’t even pass the EU custom as food fit for humans because of the large number of antibiotic and grow hormones. Yes poison is cheap.

  • You are aware that the average tax in USA is 24.0% (for year 2019 from oecd.org) and the average in Sweden is 27.1% ? (for year 2019 from SCB.se) so extremly high taxes?

  • If your friends pay 1000$ a month for healthcare in US and the average tax is 1006$ a month in sweden (For year 2019 from the statistic govermental webpage SCB) then the taxes doesn't seem so high?

  • You are handsome 😍 #FizzyFamBam

  • * Sweden has no fees for national parks, nature reserves, and many other outdoor attractions. * DSL Internet service is cheaper in Sweden than in the United States. * High-end European wines at Systembolaget are less expensive than anywhere else in Europe, since they are taxed by alcohol and not by price. Some are even cheaper than they would be in the vineyard.

  • kan du använda antibiotika och tillväksthormoner i fodret så vist du får ett billigare kött

  • I know something that is cheaper in Sweden, healthcare.

  • I do not understand why you move from the United States to the country that God forgot. Healthcare is a joke, are you kidding?

  • I’m a Swede in America and my American husband laughed when I told him I the limit of paying for healthcare is like 1000 Sek - anything after that is high cost and is covered by the government. Here it’s thousands of $$. Also the sports it’s insane. I was involved in a gymnastics club and it cost each kid $600/year plus trips, uniforms, volunteering from parents etc. In my Swedish club it cost at the most 1000 sek per semester(termin)

  • Playing sports being expensive was surprising to me. I thought it was cheap everywhere.

  • Cell phone service is way cheaper here, concur. Same with decent broadband internet service, both consumer and commercial, WAY cheaper here in Sweden compared to the US. Private Car/Home insurance way cheaper here. Childcare and/or after school programs are exponentially cheaper here.

  • Water is cheap. Around 16kr per 1000 liters and this includes a fee for the infrastructure by the way. Too cheap. If we can let the tap be open for hours just to water our lawns, it’s too cheap.

  • OCH trots att vi har mycket bra högkostnadsskydd både på vård och medicin så gnälls det!

  • All I am thinking as a swede who lived in the U.S for a few years is how is not candy and sweets on this list!

  • I mean for me in the U.S I have 5 lines of unlimited 4g data with hotspots for like $60 a month

  • if you totally missed it, Swedish ppl are Tech geeks..

  • "Sweden is expensive" Me who lives in Poland: wants to find out how much 20 dollars is in polish money Also me: figures out it's around 80-90zł Yeah I guess Poland can be quite expensive to 😂

    • He Said The Sum - at SWEDISH SEK - ALSO ! There Are Even Ferries from Poland to Sweden - Do They Have a www Page ?

  • As I understand, the American tuition fee covers not only the college admission, but also housing, food, all learning materials such as books, excursions etc. In Sweden and elsewhere where there are no tuition fees, only the admission is free. You have to pay for everything else by yourself.

    • Sort of. Through CSN, students are still offered help with their living expenses. You get around 11000 SEK/month, of which ~30% is a grant and the rest is a very favorable loan. You can live off that, although many students supplement that income through work or savings.

  • Another big one is childcare. People in the US pay thousands every month for childcare.

  • With prescripted medication in Sweden you pay up to 1100kr then it's free for 1year. So technically you pay maximum 1100kr for prescripted medication per year ☺️ Like me - I eat medication for being bipolar everyday. I get my medications once a month. They are kind of expensive so I pay maybe 700kr for one month the next I pay 400kr and the next 10months I get them for free ☺️ - this is to make it possible for everyone to get proper medication for there different health issues 🥰

    • @Mah. com Lets not forget that prescription medication is 100% free for children under the age of 18. As long as said medication fall under the "högkostnadsskyddet".

    • The right amount is maximum 2350 kr = $280 for prescription medicines and 1150 kr = $137 for appointment times.

  • I was really surprised when I heard about the cost of playing soccer in the US. My 12 year old daughter plays soccer several times a week and I think that we pay about 1600 SEK a year... Crazy!

  • Det skulle vara intressant att göra en jämförelse mellan Sverige och USA när amerikanerna får betala egna sjukförsäkringar och sparande till barnens utbildning upp till motsvarande nivå som i Sverige. Speciellt då om jämför en en välbetald bank-yuppie i New York med en 5-barnsfamilj med låg inkomst.

    • @Stig Berg grejen är ju att alla inte har jobb eller inte kan arbeta av olika anledningar. Där kan vem som helst hamna. Och att inkludera alla i ett samhälle ger ett friskare samhälle med mer trygghet.

    • Sjukförsäkringar i USA är normalt inkluderat i anställningen, och då gäller den worldwide. Har du fem barn i Sverige med låg lön har du ett uselt liv.

  • Health care

  • *koff* *koff* Healthcare *koff*

  • Sports fees are also cheap thanks to the taxes. Clubs gets money for each active member. I found fruit and vegetables extremely expensive in the US. Actually not only. I found all “real” food like we eat here in Sweden expensive. The only food I found cheap in the US was processed food like chicken nuggets.

  • It's obvious you don't have kids ;) Childcare costs are way, waaaay, waaaay cheaper in Sweden!

  • Finland has the absolutely best cellphone coverage

  • Random but still....why is there only like 3 types of cheese here in a US grocery shop to choose from,while in Europe there's a plethora of em?Sorry for the weird question but the struggle is real Lol

  • I am from Sweden but I remember how it shocked me that friends from Germany and Belgium told me they GOT PAID to play soccer as kids?? You just had to be good enough to get to a certain level and you'd be paid monthly. An ex of mine said that he got around 700€ per month for playing soccer after school, when he was only a young teenager. How insane is that?!? He wasnt even in a super high league or team, it was just good enough normal football...

  • I was pretty surprised by the sports thing. But when I stop and think about it I think it makes sense considering smaller sports organisations can apply for... uh... "bidrag", here in Sweden. And I would assume they don't get those kind of benefits in the US.

  • Think that most of us who live in sweden, think it's rather cheap. Specially if you compare to a country like norway

  • Vi lägger ca 50% av vår skatt på sjukvård. Så vår välfärd lägga mest på vård! Rolig fakta att veta var vår största del av vår skatt går till! 😊

    • Nej. 13% går till hälsa och sjukvård. Det ingår en viss del sjukvård i socialt skydd men det är inte 37%.

  • Not to mention potable water, since you can take tap water

  • The sports fees in Sweden has risen a lot the last decades. It's more privately funded, less subsidies from tax money going to this kind of activities.

  • netonnet,öob,rusta,ikea

  • Well sports for kids up to 16 years are sponsored by the tax payers too, and some people even want the community or the government to support hockeyclubs for adults too.

  • Are you saying that you get a bachelor degree in college?

  • The tax goes to so much more than healthcare and college. It goes to the elderly people, childcare, librarys, the roads, to sports (its good for people to exercise, and keep the young ones out of the streets), to colture work, the work with the environment, to disabled people, you get some money every month for every child you have, you get money for over a year parentes leave, you get money when your sick from work or when your are home with sick children. And more....

  • Here’s another surprising fact. Quality wine. Because Sweden has a monopoly on alcohol distribution, the prices on quality wine is lower than in almost any other country. Why? In a unregulated market, quality products typically gets higher markups in every step of the delivery chain. Systembolaget is not allowed to have different markups on different wines, hence, high quality wine is relatively cheaper. In addition the range of products is something you cannot get anywhere else. Systembolaget in a small town has a range not even the most well stocked liquor store in London or New York can match.

  • Whatt...? The club fees is more than 10 times as high in the US, insane!

  • Ok, you covered playing sports: What about watching? I don't watch sports live - it's easier to follow on TV, but i still know that, pretty much everyone can afford to go see a hockey-game in Sweden. It's much more expensive in the U.S, because the NHL-players need their millions.

  • If I wasent payed buy a footballclub before I was 15 I would have qiut. To hear about these expesive playerfees is just insane.

  • What per cent does the average Swede pay for taxes?

    • Don’t know average, but if you earn $60000/yr, you pay 25% in tax.

  • 4:53, very American way to think. It benefits you greatly if other people around you get an education, it benefits everyone whether they go to university or not, thats why it's funded through tax.

    • Exactly. That is the point that most people who complain about high taxes miss. I wouldn't want to live in a country where a lot of people around me can't afford education and healthcare.

  • Tap water is extremely cheap in Sweden compared to most countries. You may not notice this if water is included in your rent. But for everyone who lives in a house where you pay by how much water your household consumes, this matters. But a lot of Swedes doesnt even know how cheap our water is. I wasnt aware of this until I was living next door to a foreign exchange student from Austria who pointed out me wasting water when doing the dishes. To me, water had always been a very cheap thing that you dont have to bother much about how much you consume. Then we started comparing prices and realized tap water was several times higher in Austria. Sweden is blessed with large amount of rivers with good fresh water.

  • He is one in a million, best among many, most trusted , I almost gave up on trading then I met him through a friend, Austin is the most trusted trading expert who helped the life of my family and I ,.

  • Åk till en bondgård i USA och här vet ja..

  • Fee free high ed, including technical school, means many more skilled workers. Usually things are built well, and repairs are done correctly. Construction is much better, since the builder didn't just pick up workers at home depo. In 12 years my apartment has needed no repairs, even the paint is still looks decent. I am happy to pay my "high taxes" because I get the benefits of things working right. Cruise ships powered by diesel, make us pay by polluting the planet, so everyone pays. More than three times as much pollution per distance traveled than air travel. Hope they shut down permanently.

  • Chocolate and coffee are also surprisingly cheaper and better in Sweden.

  • Concerning taxes paying for most healthcare, in the USA only about 50% of the people pay taxes. If everyone paid taxes, our healthcare would be more affordable

  • One very important thing to note when it comes to health care costs is that the total cost (payed out of your own pocket, via insurances or via tax) is nearly twice as high in the USA compared with Sweden. In PPP US dollars (purchasing power parity) per capita the health care cost per year in the USA is 10600 dollars compared to 5800 dollars here in Sweden. The same numbers for the UK is 4600 dollars, Norway 6800 dollars, France 5200 dollars. All numbers are from 2018. It seems private health care and health care insurances is a huge rip off. More or less all private business must make profit. Budget plans of 25-30% EBITDA profit (earnings before interest, taxes and depreciation and amortization) are not uncommon. Let's say that the health care owner wants 30% in EBITDA and then the insurance company wants 30% as well. Interest on interest in only two steps (the chain can be even longer within the health care system) means that 69% of the insurance fee's are profit (EBITDA).

  • Swedes believe that their meat is better. Most meat is from polish “animal hotels” owned by the danes. I bought meat at ICA that smelled uncastrated pig. Whenever they marinate it, it´s to hide something. I have a suspicion that they´re doing what they did with the old lightbulbs. Worse and worse quality to make you buy the new generation. When about meat, to chose vegan alternatives.

  • When it comes to chicken, you get what you pay for. A lot of the chickens raised in the U.S. are shipped to China for processing and then shipped back frozen to the U.S. Raised and shipped under horrible conditions. Yummy :-)

  • Childcare!

  • Fee healthcare is both a boon and a bane. It's dishonest to only espouse it as the greatest thing ever, just as it is wrong to say it has no utility. It is of course a great safety to know that you will always have access to help if needed. It is funded by taxes, so you never really get it for free - and if you're healthy, you're only paying for everyone else. But one negative aspect is with queues. In Sweden we talk about the sometimes very long "vårdkö" (translated to health queue or care queue). At times it can be as long as 6 months or a year. Imagine having a serious illness, and there is no way for you to get treated NOW - you have to wait in line for a FRICKIN' year. This is something that doesn't happen in a place with an open market hospital. You'd just pay and be treated right away. But then again comes the question, what about the people who can't pay to begin with? It's not the perfect system many try to picture it. But it's also not an easy question.

  • What cell phone plan companies do you recommend ? Is Telia good?

    • They Are All The Same - They use same standart - & poles !

    • Depends on where you live. If you're going to really rural places or spending a lot of time in the north, Telia usually has the best coverage there. Otherwise, it doesn't matter much, just pick whatever gives you the best deal.

  • Sports fee surprised me the most. I think 4000 kr a year is normal to pay here.

  • -Stop talking with your hands or noone vill believe you! Are you italian or what?

    • @Curious Haakan Sapessi quanto cazzo me ne frega... Traditori , la storia non vi perdonerá.

    • @Curious Haakan E che minchia te ne frega a te?!

    • @Curious Haakan Ha-ha! I´m from north Italy and we use hands communication as an aid tool when we have to explain staff to childrens with language impairment. It may be offensiv to normal people.

    • Here you have an example of an effective communicator of Swedish (Lars Trägårdh). To use one's hands in this way is perfectly normal in Sweden (and if anything, occurs more among effective communicators): selists.info/less/video/mtKfhqabbtOZg9I.html

  • You also don't pay to receive calls on your cell phone in Sweden as you do in the US. No matter if it's long-distance or local.

  • Is taxes realy that high? it depends on how you look at it in comparison to the u.s. Yes..we pay roughly 33% in taxes every month,that's true..but for an american to get the same service,he has to pay much more - i mean just the fact to pay 1000$/month for a healtinsurance?? that's about 30% + of a normal salary in sweden, i woud guess if you sums it all up,then we pay probably half of an average american for the same services

    • It’s not that common to pay 33% in income tax. The norm would be around 24% with a salary around $50k /yr

  • Healthcare: the price of various medicare treatments can be checked quite easily as the full price is available on Google. In most cases, the cost of treatment, like expensive medical treatment for MS, Kidney transplant, Insulin or whatever, is in most cases at a double price in the US compared to Sweden (meaning the cost to fix the problem, by the hospital), but as said the payment upfront is only some 25 USD. In some cases, you end up in a situation you could not plan for, like one I know who got TBC on a trip. After a pretty heavy treatment, he asked what the full cost of that was, covered by our universal healthcare; about 25.000 USD.

  • Regarding education, it gets better. You actually get paid about $400/month by the government for studying at university or college (both are free). If you're under 29, you can also apply for a housing allowance which pays part of your rent. Also, the interest rate on student loans is about 0.15% (0.05% temporarily this year due to covid)

  • In France, an annuel club fee for soccer is between 60 up to 150€ a year, I was shocked to hear that it’s this much expensive in the us

    • USA is very much like a Developing country. The elite few lives in abundance and the poor majority gets exploited more and more. Due to the very disfunctional political system where politicians have to beg for money from the rich elite, it has often been referred to as an oligarchy.

  • Alot of the museums you can visit for free :)

    • Not if the Moderates get back in power. Love the free museums.

  • What do you think the Americans would have to pay for taxes if the Govt tried to ballance the budget the way Sweden does? What if 28 trillion of debt is to be repaid?

  • Try out Norway, Sweden seems cheap in comparison

  • So basicly about give or take 30.000 kr per year. Ps being a parent in sweden compared to US is cheap just fair warning. :)

  • Higher taxes means more "free" or "cheap" things that actually matters to your quality of life. Such as "free" university education, and commute on boats included in your subway card.

  • Look up the cost of buying an average-quality horse in Sweden vs the US. Sure, there are expensive breeds in Sweden (and of course individuals bred for high-level competitions). But if you just want any old horse for a bit of hobby riding, the cost is about a tenth or less in Sweden. For some Americans, the only way they can afford a horse is to adopt a rescue or get one cheap from an auction (where the horse may well be drugged to hide lameness or worse). While in Sweden, you can buy a completely healthy former trotter for like 5000 kr, or a healthy pony for your child for 15 000 kr. (Again, not all breeds, and these horses aren't super well trained. But they exist.)

  • Thanks for sharing. So surprised that health is cheap in Sweden. I will like to know if house is cheap in Sweden. Cheers.

    • Houses and land are very expensive in Sweden. its usualy about 1-200 000$ or 10x that (Yes, 1 000 000$ (!) in the more attractive areas close to the bigger cities, (or 3-50 000 for a realy sheap house in bad condition in the very rural areas). Mainly due to the insane loan system we hawe here wich also makes the whole merket to crach and people to loose huge money, no reason at all, it's nothing but insane here. Obviously no honest money can pay all that without taking those cursed loans wich drivse the inflation hell even further down the drain. It is not like this in countries like Germany, there people hawe to pay with money that actualy exist, as i guess one hawe to in the US.

  • Good list. Sports may be cheap but the clubs "force" us parents to "volunteer" as ticket salesman, parking attendants and so on for games. We also have to drive our kids to a lot of stuff on our own instead of the club having buses for example.

  • Childcare is also very cheap compared to the US. It´s based on your income, so households with lower salaries pay less. But no one (no matter how high income they have) say more than 1 510 SEK (178 USD) per child and month for kindergarten/preschool. I also think it´s cheaper in Sweden to learn how to play a instrument, Kulturskolan, formerly known as kommunala musikskolan give a lot of kids the opportunity to play instruments. Some attributes Swedens success in the music industry to this.

  • I don't think taxes are that much lower in USA,, but have no clue. But throw in the various insurances to get the same coverage you get "for free" in Sweden and I guess we're pretty close. One think I noticed was very expensive in USA was "lösgodis" (the kind of candy you pick yourself and pay by the pound). You can in major stores get a kg of candy for SEK40.

    • The vast majority of people in the US have free healthcare through their job. I'm not sure why Europeans think everybody pays a lot in the US. Before 2010 healthcare was very cheap (much cheaper than Sweden's taxes) for individuals as well. Some legislation occurred in 2010 that caused massive increases to insurance costs and lowered the quality of healthcare.